The Lesson In Tactics From Charlottesville

Yesterday’s Charlottesville post was mostly concerned with the event as a whole from a legal and constitutional standpoint. And on that score, Unite The Right, who were there protesting the removal of a Robert E. Lee statue were expressing a first amendment right, and had gotten the OK of the authorities. Any violence that occurred was because Antifa ‘counter-protesters’ showed up with the explicit intent to bring the ruckus. The police and the government, perhaps deliberately, did little to prevent the powder keg from exploding. The authorities are ultimately responsible for spiral of violence that followed.

That doesn’t mean Richard Spencer and company can be proud of themselves for the events of the weekend. They made a substantial tactical error by continuing to permit the Nazi LARPing, even feeding into it with some of the visuals from the torch rally the night before. As I said in the post yesterday: if you actually want to win the long run, where winning is restoring America to her former greatness, extolling the virtues of 1930s German National Socialism is an odd way to do it, to put it mildly. Continue reading “The Lesson In Tactics From Charlottesville”

On the Violence in Charlottesville

My take on what happened in Charlottesville:

Whatever you think of Unite the Right, or the demonstration against the removal of a Robert E. Lee statue, they had a lawful and constitutional right to stage a peaceful rally. The only reason violence “broke out” was because Antifa operate on the principle of “We don’t like you so you can’t associate, so we’ll stop you from associating by any means necessary.” This is unlawful.

To the extent to which there were Nazi cosplayers among the Unite the Right crowd is almost irrelevant. This is the United States of America, one has the right to express his or herself, no matter how terrible that expression is. Furthermore, and I reiterate – the Unite the Right crowd went through the proper channels, obtained a permit to demonstrate, working with the authorities to guarantee a safe environment. Antifa did not.

The Antifa “counter-protesters” went there with the express purpose of breaking up a legitimate, constitutionally backed assembly of individuals. That is a crime, an infringement on the rights of others. Doubly so when the means of breaking up said assembly was through violence.

Antifa responding to a rally it doesn’t like

Now, the argument leveled by Antifa is that the mere existence of Unite the Right/white nationalists/whatever is itself a violent act. Indeed, anyone who voices opinions to the right of Lenin is lumped together by Antifa as dispensers of ‘hate speech,’ and thus violent actors against whom counter-violence is acceptable, and even honorable. These are communists after all, and they don’t shy away from it, with hammer and sickle flags flying high above their congregations, and propaganda posters which highlight the influence of the intellectual progenitor of the movement, Bolshevism. Continue reading “On the Violence in Charlottesville”

Reality Doesn’t Care About Feelings, Vol. 7 – James Damore v Goolag

In 1957, Chairman Mao said the following during a speech in Peking:

Letting a hundred flowers blossom and a hundred schools of thought contend is the policy for promoting progress in the arts and the sciences and a flourishing socialist culture in our land.

The speech was intended to encourage Chinese intellectuals to voice their criticism of the Chinese system, such that it could be improved. What ended up happening was that the outpouring of dissent against the Communist regime was used as evidence in the sentencing of those intellectuals to hard labor and prison for crimes against the regime.

The period was known as the Hundred Flowers Campaign. The recent case of Google engineer James Damore and his viral memo has parallels to what happened during that campaign. Google’s Vice President of Diversity, Integrity & Governance, Danielle Brown released a statement in response to the memo, part of which contained the following:

Diversity and inclusion are a fundamental part of our values and the culture we continue to cultivate. We are unequivocal in our belief that diversity and inclusion are critical to our success as a company, and we’ll continue to stand for that and be committed to it for the long haul. As Ari Balogh said in his internal G+ post, “Building an open, inclusive environment is core to who we are, and the right thing to do. ‘Nuff said.”

Like Mao, Brown was effusive in the praise for multiple viewpoints, openness, and inclusion, which she described as ‘critical to our success as a company.’

Yet, Damore’s views clearly were not acceptable, both internally and to the public as word of the memo started to spread. Continue reading “Reality Doesn’t Care About Feelings, Vol. 7 – James Damore v Goolag”